Posts

Expansion of the Tablet PC Portfolio for Hazardous Areas

The extremely robust devices are splashproof and can withstand extreme temperatures. Equipped with a display that is readable in direct sunlight and a powerful quad-core processor, they allow for fast work with the latest applications, offer numerous configuration options for corporate use and have an extremely long standby time. This can be extended even further by the replaceable battery, which ensures uninterrupted field work. In addition, the devices have NFC, Bluetooth 3.0 and two powerful cameras. The Lumen X4 may also be also equipped with an optional high-performance scanner for bar code scanning with a 1D/2D imager or for the detection of RFID HF tags.

World Congress on Petroleum Processing, Petrochemistry and Chemical Engineering

Theme: Straddling the gap between miles & milestone

Conference Series seeks your gracious presence at this colossal congregation of the world of Chemical Sciences at the “World Congress on Petroleum Processing, Petrochemistry and Chemical Engineering’’ during November 09-10, 2018, at Birmingham, Alabama, USA. Petroleum Processing 2018 is being organized with the theme of: Straddling the gap between miles & milestone.

Petroleum Processing 2018 assures its attendees of a platform, perfect for the exchange and sharing of invaluable knowledge, research findings and experiences that can happen with clarity as that of a crystal. Basics-new & old, emerging technologies, their “know-hows” and their impact on the present scenario of the Petroleum industries are some of the few knowledges that can be noted under the “to-be-gained-in-conference” list. Explore & Experience the words and beyond the lines from the notable speakers’ presentations, exhibition desks and posters-all related to the minutes of the concerned fields of the colloquium.

The conference is going to include prompt Keynote presentations, Oral talks, Poster presentations, Workshops, Symposiums and Exhibitions.

Petroleum refineries generally converts much of the barrel of crude oil into transportation fuels which is economically practical. Refineries produce many profitable products such as the transportation fuel gasoline, turbine (jet) fuels, diesel and the light heating oils. These are counted as the high-volume profitable products of refineries. Petroleum refining begins with distillation or fractionation of crude oils into separate hydrocarbon groups. The characteristics of the crude oil reflects in the resultant product. Most of the distillation products are further converted into useful products by changing the size and structure of the hydrocarbon molecules through cracking, reforming and other conversion processes.

Crude oils are basically classified as naphthenic, paraffinic or aromatic based on the predominant proportion of similar hydrocarbons. Mixed – base crudes have varying amounts of each type of hydrocarbon. Refinery crude base stocks consist mixtures of two or more different crude oils.

Conferences are some of best times to meet and get inspired by scientists & inventors globally.

GASTECH 2018

Gastech exhibition is a unique business platform showcasing services, products and expertise to over 30,000 natural gas, LNG and energy professionals.

Gastech is where the global upstream, midstream, downstream and integrated natural gas, LNG and energy value chain gather to do business.

The Gastech exhibition is where business is made and done. Exhibiting at Gastech provides your company with a unique business platform to showcase your company’s services, products and expertise to over 30,000 natural gas, LNG and energy professionals.

Renowned as the world’s most significant meeting place for upstream, midstream and downstream gas and LNG professionals, where they convene to do business.

The Gastech conference is one of the world’s largest gas, LNG and energy conferences. The strongest programme to date, this four-day multi-streamed programme features 350 speakers and 250 presentations from across the upstream, midstream and downstream value chains.

The Gastech Conference consists of the Plenary Stage, Strategic conference and Technical conference streams, and four Specialist Conferences.

33rd European Autumn Gas Conference (EAGC 2018)

The 33rd European Autumn Gas Conference (EAGC 2018) is dedicated to important issues impacting today’s commercial gas market in Europe including:

  • European Gas – The Ever More Buffeting Winds of Context
  • Does Europe Have the Right Commercial Arrangements
  • Regulation updates

The 33rd European Autumn Gas Conference (EAGC 2018) brings together Commercial business decision-makers and leaders and governmental representatives operating in Europe’s gas market and involved in:

  • Classification/Certification
  • Carbon Capture & Storage
  • Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Local Content, Fiscal Regimes
  • Consultancy
  • Exploration & Production
  • EPC/FEED
  • FLNG
  • Finance/Banking
  • Gas Processing
  • Gasification
  • HSE (Health, Safety & Environment)
  • Gas Shipping
  • Legal Services
  • International Oil & Gas Company (IOC)
  • Media/Publications
  • LNG Production & Marketing
  • Pipeline
  • National Oil & Gas Company (NOC)
  • Power Generation/Utility
  • Plants, Terminals, Transmission & Gas Storage
  • Research & Development
  • Recruitment, Education & Training
  • Renewable Energy

November 7-9, 2018   Berlin, Germany

Scientists have discovered new materials that could bring widespread commercial use of solid oxide fuel cells closer to reality.

Using advanced computational methods, University of Wisconsin-Madison materials scientists have discovered new materials that could bring widespread commercial use of solid oxide fuel cells closer to reality.

A solid oxide fuel cell is essentially an engine that provides an alternative way to burn fossil fuels or hydrogen to generate power. These fuel cells burn their fuel electrochemically instead of by combustion, and are more efficient than any practical combustion engine.

As an alternative energy technology, solid oxide fuel cells are a versatile, highly efficient power source that could play a vital role in the future of energy. Solid oxide fuel cells could be used in a variety of applications, from serving as a power supply for buildings to increasing fuel efficiency in vehicles.

However, solid oxide fuel cells are more costly than conventional energy technologies, and that has limited their adoption.

“Better cathode catalysts can allow lower-temperature operation, which can increase stability and reduce costs, potentially allowing you to take your building off the electrical grid and instead power it with a solid oxide fuel cell running on natural gas,” says Dane Morgan, a materials science and engineering professor at UW-Madison. “If we can get to that point with solid oxide fuel cells, the infrastructure of power to many buildings in the country could change, and it would be a very big transformation to a more decentralized power infrastructure.”

Led by Morgan and Ryan Jacobs, a staff scientist in Morgan’s research group, a team of UW-Madison engineers has harnessed quantum mechanics-based computational techniques to search for promising new candidate materials that could enable solid oxide fuel cells to operate at lower temperatures, with higher efficiency and longer lifetimes.

Their computational screening of more than 2,000 candidate materials from a broad class of compounds called perovskites yielded a list of 52 potential new cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells.

The researchers published details of their advance recently in the journal Advanced Energy Materials.

“With this research, we’ve provided specific recommendations of promising compounds that should be explored further,” says Morgan, whose work is supported by the U.S. Air Force and the National Science Foundation. “Some of the new candidate cathode materials we identified could be transformative for solid oxide fuel cells for reducing costs.”

In addition to identifying new materials, the researchers’ approach allowed them to codify material design principles that had previously been based on intuition and to offer suggestions for improving existing materials.

Typically, solid oxide fuel cells must operate at temperatures around 800 degrees Celsius. But operating at these high temperatures means materials in the fuel cell degrade quickly and limit the device’s working life. The goal, says Jacobs, is to enable solid oxide fuel cells to operate at a lower temperature, and slow that degradation. Fuel cells with long lifetimes wouldn’t need frequent replacements, making them more cost-effective.

To achieve this goal, the researchers set out to find stable compounds with high activity to catalyze the oxygen reduction reaction, a chemical process key to solid oxide fuel cell energy applications.

“If you can find new compounds that are both stable under the operating conditions of the fuel cell and highly catalytically active, you can take that stable, highly active material and use it at a reduced temperature while still achieving the desired performance from the fuel cell,” explains Jacobs, who was the lead author of the study.

However, using computational modeling to quantitatively calculate the catalytic activity of a perovskite compound is prohibitively difficult because of the high complexity of the oxygen reduction reaction.

To overcome this challenge, the researchers used an approach where they selected a physical parameter that was more straightforward to calculate, and then showed empirically that it correlated with the catalytic activity, thus serving as an effective proxy for the catalytic activity. Once they established these correlations with data from experiments, the researchers were able to use high-throughput computational tools to effectively screen a large group of materials for high catalytic activity.

The UW-Madison researchers are collaborating with a group at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which conducted initial testing on one of the team’s candidate cathode materials.

“This research is ongoing, but the early tests by our NETL collaborators found the material to be quite promising,” Morgan says.

Morgan says this project is an example of the kind of advances that are aided by the Materials Genome Initiative, an ongoing national effort that aims to double the speed with which the country discovers, develops and manufactures new materials.

“This project integrated correlations from experiments with online digital databases and high-throughput computational tools in order to design new solid oxide fuel cell materials, so it’s exactly the kind of thing that gets enabled by the infrastructure and approaches that have been developed and put in place by the Materials Genome Initiative,” Morgan says.

Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com

SPE Annual Caspian Technical Conference & Exhibition 2018

In 2018, CTCE returns to Kazakhstan, with a focus on the changing market conditions that face the oil and gas industry throughout the Caspian region and globally. Local, regional and international experts will present their knowledge, expertise and best practice providing the perfect platform for professional development, unique networking and the opportunity to exchange knowledge and experience among participants.

Over 550 oil and gas professionals attended last years’ CTCE drawing attendees from 21 countries across the globe, including Azerbaijan, Russia, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan and numerous countries outside the Caspian Region. The event saw participation from key industry players including SOCAR, BP, Total, Statoil, ExxonMobil, Tengizchevroil, JSC NC KazMunayGaz, Dragon Oil, Petronas, INPEX, Gazprom Neft PJSC, Novatek, Resman, Roxar, Goldman Sachs, Lukoil, Schlumberger, Halliburton, Baker Hughes to name a few.

24 – 26 Oct 2018 Astana, Kazakhstan

For energy experts, new method is a gas

Process could help quantify untapped natural gas reservoirs

Researchers have developed a method that will help natural gas experts better understand shale samples and eventually help them decide whether to invest time and resources to extract gas from the formation the samples came from.

More than 30 states have shale formations that harbor natural gas underground, according to the Energy Information Administration. But industry experts can’t agree on exactly how much fuel is inside. That’s because natural gas and other hydrocarbons lie inside nano-scale, difficult-to-measure pores in shale rocks, which have properties that are not yet understood.

“If you want to estimate the storage capacity of shale gas, you need to understand materials that store them,” said Yun Liu, an affiliated associate professor of chemical engineering at the University of Delaware and a physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research.

Now, using neutron scattering, Liu and a team of researchers from UD, NIST and Aramco Services Company have developed a novel non-invasive method to measure the variation of surface properties deep inside porous materials.

This method can help natural gas experts to better understand shale samples by examining the compositional distribution on porous surfaces inside the shales that directly influences the storage and transport of hydrocarbons. This would eventually help them decide whether to invest time and resources to extract gas from the formation the samples came from. The findings of this study, published Thursday, Feb. 22 in the journal Nature Communications, could also be used to understand many other different types of porous materials using neutron scattering or X-ray scattering.

Investigating pores

It’s not just the size of pores that matters, but the surface structure and surface chemistry, since natural gas interacts with the outer edges of each tiny pore in the rock. The properties of the pores also determine how gas will flow out of the formation.

To understand these pores, the research team started with samples of isolated shale kerogen, an organic matter that stores the majority of hydrocarbons such as natural gas in shales. To peer inside the kerogen, they used small-angle neutron scattering, shooting a beam of subatomic neutrons through a substance and collecting information on the neutrons’ behavior to determine the properties of the pores. Neutron scattering is non-destructive, unlike electron microscopy, another common method used to investigate porous materials.

Next the group measured the change of neutron scattering signals with gas sorption at different pressures. The change of neutron intensity reflects the compositional distribution on the surfaces inside a sample.

This new method can reveal new information that other methods do not, such as the surface heterogeneity. Put simply, it provides information that helps researchers better understand what they are working with. When added to other information collected from a site, it can aid decision-making.

“Most of the other techniques used in the petroleum field provide the ‘average’ values of sample parameters,” said study author Wei-Shan Chiang, a postdoctoral researcher in chemical and biomolecular engineering at UD who does work onsite at NIST Center for Neutron Research and at Aramco Services Company. “Our method provides both ‘average’ and ‘deviation’ (the width of distribution) of the material properties.”

This method should also work on many other materials, such as cement, and maybe even biological materials such as blood, said Liu. The team looks forward to applying their method to new systems.

Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com

Debate and discuss the global issues and challenges facing the gas and LNG community in 2018 and beyond

Where the world’s experts and leaders debate and discuss the global issues and challenges facing the gas and LNG community in 2018 and beyond.

This four day, multi streamed programme features ministerial and global business dialogue sessions and strategic panel sessions alongside 28 strategic sessions. 82 Technical sessions make up the newly expanded technical conference, addressing the complete value chain from exploration and production through to distribution and will highlight new technologies and industry developments.

The Strategic Conference

Expect to hear from the natural gas, LNG and energy industry’s visionaries, ministers, business leaders, influencers and movers and shakers as they delve into 28 strategic sessions across 14 core topics.

17-20 SEPTEMBER 2018 | BARCELONA | SPAIN

Orbit X – Remote Inspection and Video Conferences in Hazardous Areas

The rugged, intrinsically safe Wi-Fi camera Orbit X developed by BARTEC PIXAVI makes mobile work safer and more efficient. Certified to CSA, IECEx and ATEX Zone 1, it allows flexible and efficient working, improved work flows and quick, precise decisions in the field.

Orbit X works just as well as a helmet, inspection or surveillance camera. It is easy to operate and is suitable for use as both a stand-alone solution and as part of a network. Two integrated LEDs, a built-in laser pointer and optional accessories like headsets, wall brackets or telescopic rods expand the operating area of this high-tech solution to cover even dark and difficult to access areas. Alongside ad-hoc meetings and trouble-shooting with remotely linked experts, the tested usages also cover live streaming and CCTV applications, as well as video recordings for inspection or training. As well as the direct Wi-Fi connection to the network, the camera can also be coupled with the Impact X for a mobile connection (smartphone pairing).

The Android-based Wi-Fi camera stands out thanks to its ultra-clear, intense 8 megapixel color images and 1080p videos, which can be saved locally on the device or streamed wirelessly in high quality. The SIPIDO Mobile Telepresence app, included as standard, supports SIP-capable video conference systems and applications, as well as browser-based real-time communication via web- RTC. All of the settings required for these functions, whether video, Wi-Fi or SIPIDO, can be made easily and comfortably using the Collaboration X management tool from BARTEC PIXAVI.

Source: https://www.pixavi.com/

Equipment for explosive atmospheres (ATEX)

Directive 2014/34/EU

Short name: Equipment for explosive atmospheres (ATEX)
Base: Directive 2014/34/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on the harmonisation of the laws of the Member States relating to equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres (recast). Applicable from 20 April 2016.
OJ L 96, 29.3.2014
Modification: [-]
Directives repealed

(applicable until 20 April 2016):

Directive 94/9/EC of the European Parliament and the Council of 23 March 1994 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States concerning equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres
OJ L 100 of 19 April 1994
Guide for application:
Commission contact point: Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs
Mr Mario GABRIELLI COSSELLU, Tel +32 2 299 59 41
Email
Webpage on equipment and protective systems for potentially explosive atmosphere – ATEX
For information about the content and availability of European standards, please contact the European Standardisation Organisations.

Publication of references of harmonised standards on equipment for explosive atmospheres in the Official Journal under:

Directive 94/9/EC

Commission communication in the framework of the implementation of the Directive 94/9/EC of the European Parliament and the Council of 23 March 1994 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States concerning equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres – OJ C 126 of 08/04/2016 
BG CS DA DE EL EN ES ET FI FR HR HU IT LT LV MT NL PL PT RO SK SL SV PDF Format
(This list replaces all the previous lists published in the Official Journal.)

Directive 2014/34/EU – view the list under the section ‘Publications in the Official Journal’ below.

 

 

Publications in the Official Journal:

 

Stay up to date with the references of harmonised standards for this Directive, published in the Official Journal by subscribing to the RSS feed  RSS

 

Summary list of titles and references of harmonised standards under Directive 2014/34/EU for Equipment explosive atmospheres (ATEX)

The summary list hereunder is a compilation of the references of harmonised standards which have been generated by the HAS (Harmonised standards) database. This IT application HAS automates the process of the publication of the references of harmonised standards in the Official Journal of the European Union.
Although the list is updated regularly, it may not be complete and it does not have any legal validity; only publication in the Official Journal gives legal effect.

 

(Publication of titles and references of harmonised standards under Union harmonisation legislation)

ESO (1)

Reference and title of the standard
(and reference document)

First publication OJ

Reference of superseded standard

Date of cessation of presumption of conformity of superseded standard
Note 1

CEN EN 1010-1:2004+A1:2010

Safety of machinery – Safety requirements for the design and construction of printing and paper converting machines – Part 1: Common requirements

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1010-2:2006+A1:2010

Safety of machinery – Safety requirements for the design and construction of printing and paper converting machines – Part 2: Printing and varnishing machines including pre-press machinery

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1127-1:2011

Explosive atmospheres – Explosion prevention and protection – Part 1: Basic concepts and methodology

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1127-2:2014

Explosive atmospheres – Explosion prevention and protection – Part 2: Basic concepts and methodology for mining

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1710:2005+A1:2008

Equipment and components intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres in underground mines

08/04/2016

EN 1710:2005+A1:2008/AC:2010

 

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1755:2015

Industrial Trucks – Safety requirements and verification – Supplementary requirements for operation in potentially explosive atmospheres

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1834-1:2000

Reciprocating internal combustion engines – Safety requirements for design and construction of engines for use in potentially explosive atmospheres – Part 1: Group II engines for use in flammable gas and vapour atmospheres

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1834-2:2000

Reciprocating internal combustion engines – Safety requirements for design and construction of engines for use in potentially explosive atmospheres – Part 2: Group I engines for use in underground workings susceptible to firedamp and/or combustible dust

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1834-3:2000

Reciprocating internal combustion engines – Safety requirements for design and construction of engines for use in potentially explosive atmospheres – Part 3: Group II engines for use in flammable dust atmospheres

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1839:2017

Determination of the explosion limits and the limiting oxygen concentration(LOC) for flammable gases and vapours

09/06/2017

EN 1839:2012
EN 14756:2006

Note 2.1

11/01/2018

CEN EN 1953:2013

Atomising and spraying equipment for coating materials – Safety requirements

08/04/2016

CEN EN 12581:2005+A1:2010

Coating plants – Machinery for dip coating and electrodeposition of organic liquid coating material – Safety requirements

08/04/2016

CEN EN 12621:2006+A1:2010

Machinery for the supply and circulation of coating materials under pressure – Safety requirements

08/04/2016

CEN EN 12757-1:2005+A1:2010

Mixing machinery for coating materials – Safety requirements – Part 1: Mixing machinery for use in vehicle refinishing

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13012:2012

Petrol filling stations – Construction and performance of automatic nozzles for use on fuel dispensers

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13160-1:2003

Leak detection systems – Part 1: General principles

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13237:2012

Potentially explosive atmospheres – Terms and definitions for equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13463-2:2004

Non-electrical equipment for use in potentially explosive atmospheres – Part 2: Protection by flow restricting enclosure ‘fr’

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13463-3:2005

Non-electrical equipment for use in potentially explosive atmospheres – Part 3: Protection by flameproof enclosure ‘d’

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13616-1:2016

Overfill prevention devices for static tanks for liquid fuels – Part 1: Overfill prevention devices with closure device

12/08/2016

EN 13616:2004

Note 2.1

11/07/2017

CEN EN 13617-1:2012

Petrol filling stations – Part 1: Safety requirements for construction and performance of metering pumps, dispensers and remote pumping units

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13617-2:2012

Petrol filling stations – Part 2: Safety requirements for construction and performance of safe breaks for use on metering pumps and dispensers

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13617-3:2012

Petrol filling stations – Part 3: Safety requirements for construction and performance of shear valves

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13617-4:2012

Petrol filling stations – Part 4: Safety requirements for construction and performance of swivels for use on metering pumps and dispensers

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13760:2003

Automotive LPG filling system for light and heavy duty vehicles – Nozzle, test requirements and dimensions

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13821:2002

Potentially explosive atmospheres – Explosion prevention and protection – Determination of minimum ignition energy of dust/air mixtures

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13852-1:2013

Cranes – Offshore cranes – Part 1: General-purpose offshore cranes

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14034-1:2004+A1:2011

Determination of explosion characteristics of dust clouds – Part 1: Determination of the maximum explosion pressure pmax of dust clouds

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14034-2:2006+A1:2011

Determination of explosion characteristics of dust clouds – Part 2: Determination of the maximum rate of explosion pressure rise (dp/dt)max of dust clouds

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14034-3:2006+A1:2011

Determination of explosion characteristics of dust clouds – Part 3: Determination of the lower explosion limit LEL of dust clouds

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14034-4:2004+A1:2011

Determination of explosion characteristics of dust clouds – Part 4: Determination of the limiting oxygen concentration LOC of dust clouds

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14373:2005

Explosion suppression systems

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14460:2006

Explosion resistant equipment

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14491:2012

Dust explosion venting protective systems

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14492-1:2006+A1:2009

Cranes – Power driven winches and hoists – Part 1: Power driven winches

08/04/2016

EN 14492-1:2006+A1:2009/AC:2010 (new)

 

This is the first publication

CEN EN 14492-2:2006+A1:2009

Cranes – Power driven winches and hoists – Part 2: Power driven hoists

08/04/2016

EN 14492-2:2006+A1:2009/AC:2010 (new)

 

This is the first publication

CEN EN 14522:2005

Determination of the auto ignition temperature of gases and vapours

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14591-1:2004

Explosion prevention and protection in underground mines – Protective systems – Part 1: 2-bar explosion proof ventilation structure

08/04/2016

EN 14591-1:2004/AC:2006

 

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14591-2:2007

Explosion prevention and protection in underground mines – Protective systems – Part 2: Passive water trough barriers

08/04/2016

EN 14591-2:2007/AC:2008

 

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14591-4:2007

Explosion prevention and protection in underground mines – Protective systems – Part 4: Automatic extinguishing systems for road headers

08/04/2016

EN 14591-4:2007/AC:2008

 

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14677:2008

Safety of machinery – Secondary steelmaking – Machinery and equipment for treatment of liquid steel

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14678-1:2013

LPG equipment and accessories – Construction and performance of LPG equipment for automotive filling stations – Part 1: Dispensers

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14681:2006+A1:2010

Safety of machinery – Safety requirements for machinery and equipment for production of steel by electric arc furnaces

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14797:2006

Explosion venting devices

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14973:2015

Conveyor belts for use in underground installations – Electrical and flammability safety requirements

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14983:2007

Explosion prevention and protection in underground mines – Equipment and protective systems for firedamp drainage

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14986:2017

Design of fans working in potentially explosive atmospheres

09/06/2017

EN 14986:2007

Note 2.1

31/01/2020

CEN EN 14994:2007

Gas explosion venting protective systems

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15089:2009

Explosion isolation systems

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15188:2007

Determination of the spontaneous ignition behaviour of dust accumulations

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15198:2007

Methodology for the risk assessment of non-electrical equipment and components for intended use in potentially explosive atmospheres

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15233:2007

Methodology for functional safety assessment of protective systems for potentially explosive atmospheres

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15268:2008

Petrol filling stations – Safety requirements for the construction of submersible pump assemblies

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15794:2009

Determination of explosion points of flammable liquids

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15967:2011

Determination of maximum explosion pressure and the maximum rate of pressure rise of gases and vapours

08/04/2016

CEN EN 16009:2011

Flameless explosion venting devices

08/04/2016

CEN EN 16020:2011

Explosion diverters

08/04/2016

CEN EN 16447:2014

Explosion isolation flap valves

08/04/2016

CEN EN ISO 16852:2016

Flame arresters – Performance requirements, test methods and limits for use (ISO 16852:2016)

09/06/2017

EN ISO 16852:2010

Note 2.1

30/11/2017

CEN EN ISO 80079-36:2016

Explosive atmospheres – Part 36: Non-electrical equipment for explosive atmospheres – Basic method and requirements (ISO 80079-36:2016)

12/08/2016

EN 13463-1:2009

Note 2.1

31/10/2019

CEN EN ISO 80079-37:2016

Explosive atmospheres – Part 37: Non-electrical equipment for explosive atmospheres – Non-electrical type of protection constructional safety ”c”, control of ignition sources ”b”, liquid immersion ”k” (ISO 80079-37:2016)

12/08/2016

EN 13463-5:2011
EN 13463-6:2005
EN 13463-8:2003

Note 2.1

31/10/2019

Cenelec EN 50050-1:2013

Electrostatic hand-held spraying equipment – Safety requirements – Part 1: Hand-held spraying equipment for ignitable liquid coating materials

08/04/2016

EN 50050:2006

Note 2.1

14/10/2016

Cenelec EN 50050-2:2013

Electrostatic hand-held spraying equipment – Safety requirements – Part 2: Hand-held spraying equipment for ignitable coating powder

08/04/2016

EN 50050:2006

Note 2.1

14/10/2016

Cenelec EN 50050-3:2013

Electrostatic hand-held spraying equipment – Safety requirements – Part 3: Hand-held spraying equipment for ignitable flock

08/04/2016

EN 50050:2006

Note 2.1

14/10/2016

Cenelec EN 50104:2010

Electrical apparatus for the detection and measurement of oxygen – Performance requirements and test methods

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 50176:2009

Stationary electrostatic application equipment for ignitable liquid coating material – Safety requirements

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 50177:2009

Stationary electrostatic application equipment for ignitable coating powders – Safety requirements

08/04/2016

EN 50177:2009/A1:2012

 

08/04/2016

Note 3

Cenelec EN 50223:2015

Stationary electrostatic application equipment for ignitable flock material – Safety requirements

08/04/2016

EN 50223:2010

Note 2.1

13/04/2018

Cenelec EN 50271:2010

Electrical apparatus for the detection and measurement of combustible gases, toxic gases or oxygen – Requirements and tests for apparatus using software and/or digital technologies

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 50281-2-1:1998

Electrical apparatus for use in the presence of combustible dust – Part 2-1: Test methods – Methods for determining the minimum ignition temperatures of dust

08/04/2016

EN 50281-2-1:1998/AC:1999

 

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 50303:2000

Group I, Category M1 equipment intended to remain functional in atmospheres endangered by firedamp and/or coal dust

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 50381:2004

Transportable ventilated rooms with or without an internal source of release

08/04/2016

EN 50381:2004/AC:2005

 

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 50495:2010

Safety devices required for the safe functioning of equipment with respect to explosion risks

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-0:2012

Explosive atmospheres – Part 0: Equipment – General requirements
IEC 60079-0:2011 (Modified) + IS1:2013

08/04/2016

EN 60079-0:2012/A11:2013

 

08/04/2016

Note 3

07/10/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-1:2014

Explosive atmospheres – Part 1: Equipment protection by flameproof enclosures “d”
IEC 60079-1:2014

08/04/2016

EN 60079-1:2007

Note 2.1

01/08/2017

Cenelec EN 60079-2:2014

Explosive atmospheres – Part 2: Equipment protection by pressurized enclosure “p”
IEC 60079-2:2014

08/04/2016

EN 60079-2:2007
EN 61241-4:2006

Note 2.1

25/08/2017

EN 60079-2:2014/AC:2015

 

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-5:2015

Explosive atmospheres – Part 5: Equipment protection by powder filling “q”
IEC 60079-5:2015

08/04/2016

EN 60079-5:2007

Note 2.1

24/03/2018

Cenelec EN 60079-6:2015

Explosive atmospheres – Part 6: Equipment protection by liquid immersion “o”
IEC 60079-6:2015

08/04/2016

EN 60079-6:2007

Note 2.1

27/03/2018

Cenelec EN 60079-7:2015

Explosive atmospheres – Part 7: Equipment protection by increased safety “e”
IEC 60079-7:2015

08/04/2016

EN 60079-7:2007

Note 2.1

31/07/2018

Cenelec EN 60079-11:2012

Explosive atmospheres – Part 11: Equipment protection by intrinsic safety “i”
IEC 600
IEC 60079-11:2011

08/04/2016

EN 60079-27:2008

Note 2.1

Cenelec EN 60079-15:2010

Explosive atmospheres – Part 15: Equipment protection by type of protection “n”
IEC 60079-15:2010

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-18:2015

Explosive atmospheres – Part 18: Equipment protection by encapsulation “m”
IEC 60079-18:2014

08/04/2016

EN 60079-18:2009

Note 2.1

16/01/2018

Cenelec EN 60079-20-1:2010

Explosive atmospheres – Part 20-1: Material characteristics for gas and vapour classification – Test methods and data
IEC 60079
IEC 60079-20-1:2010

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-25:2010

Explosive atmospheres – Part 25: Intrinsically safe electrical systems
IEC 60079-25:2010

08/04/2016

EN 60079-25:2010/AC:2013

 

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-26:2015

Explosive atmospheres – Part 26: Equipment with Equipment Protection Level (EPL) Ga
IEC 60079-26:2014

08/04/2016

EN 60079-26:2007

Note 2.1

02/12/2017

Cenelec EN 60079-28:2015

Explosive atmospheres – Part 28: Protection of equipment and transmission systems using optical radiation
IEC 60079-28:2015

08/04/2016

EN 60079-28:2007

Note 2.1

01/07/2018

Cenelec EN 60079-29-1:2016

Explosive atmospheres – Part 29-1: Gas detectors – Performance requirements of detectors for flammable gases
IEC 60079-29-1:2016 (Modified)

09/06/2017

EN 60079-29-1:2007

Note 2.1

23/12/2019

Cenelec EN 60079-29-4:2010

Explosive atmospheres – Part 29-4: Gas detectors – Performance requirements of open path detectors for flammable gases
IEC 60079-29-4:2009 (Modified)

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-30-1:2007

Explosive atmospheres – Part 30-1: Electrical resistance trace heating – General and testing requirements
IEC 60079-30-1:2007

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-30-1:2017 (new)

Explosive atmospheres – Part 30-1: Electrical resistance trace heating – General and testing requirements
IEC/IEEE 60079-30-1:2015 (Modified)

This is the first publication

EN 60079-30-1:2007

Note 2.1

06/03/2020

Cenelec EN 60079-31:2014

Explosive atmospheres – Part 31: Equipment dust ignition protection by enclosure “t”
IEC 60079-31:2013

08/04/2016

EN 60079-31:2009

Note 2.1

01/01/2017

Cenelec EN 60079-35-1:2011

Explosive atmospheres – Part 35-1: Caplights for use in mines susceptible to firedamp – General requirements – Construction and testing in relation to the risk of explosion
IEC 60079-35-1:2011

08/04/2016

EN 60079-35-1:2011/AC:2011

 

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN ISO/IEC 80079-34:2011

Explosive atmospheres – Part 34: Application of quality systems for equipment manufacture (ISO/IEC 80079-34:2011)

08/04/2016

(1) ESO: European standardisation organisation:

CEN: Avenue Marnix 17, B-1000, Brussels, Tel.+32 2 5500811; fax +32 2 5500819 (http://www.cen.eu)

CENELEC: Avenue Marnix 17, B-1000, Brussels, Tel.+32 2 5196871; fax +32 2 5196919 (http://www.cenelec.eu)

ETSI: 650, route des Lucioles, F-06921 Sophia Antipolis, Tel.+33 492 944200; fax +33 493 654716, (http://www.etsi.eu)

 

Note 1: Generally the date of cessation of presumption of conformity will be the date of withdrawal (“dow”), set by the European standardisation organisation, but attention of users of these standards is drawn to the fact that in certain exceptional cases this can be otherwise.

Note 2.1: The new (or amended) standard has the same scope as the superseded standard. On the date stated, the superseded standard ceases to give presumption of conformity with the essential or other requirements of the relevant Union legislation.

Note 2.2: The new standard has a broader scope than the superseded standard. On the date stated the superseded standard ceases to give presumption of conformity with the essential or other requirements of the relevant Union legislation.

Note 2.3: The new standard has a narrower scope than the superseded standard. On the date stated the (partially) superseded standard ceases to give presumption of conformity with the essential or other requirements of the relevant Union legislation for those products or services that fall within the scope of the new standard. Presumption of conformity with the essential or other requirements of the relevant Union legislation for products or services that still fall within the scope of the (partially) superseded standard, but that do not fall within the scope of the new standard, is unaffected.

Note 3: In case of amendments, the referenced standard is EN CCCCC:YYYY, its previous amendments, if any, and the new, quoted amendment. The superseded standard therefore consists of EN CCCCC:YYYY and its previous amendments, if any, but without the new quoted amendment. On the date stated, the superseded standard ceases to give presumption of conformity with the essential or other requirements of the relevant Union legislation.

Source: http://ec.europa.eu