Equipment for explosive atmospheres (ATEX)

Directive 2014/34/EU

Short name: Equipment for explosive atmospheres (ATEX)
Base: Directive 2014/34/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on the harmonisation of the laws of the Member States relating to equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres (recast). Applicable from 20 April 2016.
OJ L 96, 29.3.2014
Modification: [-]
Directives repealed

(applicable until 20 April 2016):

Directive 94/9/EC of the European Parliament and the Council of 23 March 1994 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States concerning equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres
OJ L 100 of 19 April 1994
Guide for application:
Commission contact point: Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs
Mr Mario GABRIELLI COSSELLU, Tel +32 2 299 59 41
Email
Webpage on equipment and protective systems for potentially explosive atmosphere – ATEX
For information about the content and availability of European standards, please contact the European Standardisation Organisations.

Publication of references of harmonised standards on equipment for explosive atmospheres in the Official Journal under:

Directive 94/9/EC

Commission communication in the framework of the implementation of the Directive 94/9/EC of the European Parliament and the Council of 23 March 1994 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States concerning equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres – OJ C 126 of 08/04/2016 
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(This list replaces all the previous lists published in the Official Journal.)

Directive 2014/34/EU – view the list under the section ‘Publications in the Official Journal’ below.

 

 

Publications in the Official Journal:

 

Stay up to date with the references of harmonised standards for this Directive, published in the Official Journal by subscribing to the RSS feed  RSS

 

Summary list of titles and references of harmonised standards under Directive 2014/34/EU for Equipment explosive atmospheres (ATEX)

The summary list hereunder is a compilation of the references of harmonised standards which have been generated by the HAS (Harmonised standards) database. This IT application HAS automates the process of the publication of the references of harmonised standards in the Official Journal of the European Union.
Although the list is updated regularly, it may not be complete and it does not have any legal validity; only publication in the Official Journal gives legal effect.

 

(Publication of titles and references of harmonised standards under Union harmonisation legislation)

ESO (1)

Reference and title of the standard
(and reference document)

First publication OJ

Reference of superseded standard

Date of cessation of presumption of conformity of superseded standard
Note 1

CEN EN 1010-1:2004+A1:2010

Safety of machinery – Safety requirements for the design and construction of printing and paper converting machines – Part 1: Common requirements

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1010-2:2006+A1:2010

Safety of machinery – Safety requirements for the design and construction of printing and paper converting machines – Part 2: Printing and varnishing machines including pre-press machinery

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1127-1:2011

Explosive atmospheres – Explosion prevention and protection – Part 1: Basic concepts and methodology

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1127-2:2014

Explosive atmospheres – Explosion prevention and protection – Part 2: Basic concepts and methodology for mining

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1710:2005+A1:2008

Equipment and components intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres in underground mines

08/04/2016

EN 1710:2005+A1:2008/AC:2010

 

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1755:2015

Industrial Trucks – Safety requirements and verification – Supplementary requirements for operation in potentially explosive atmospheres

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1834-1:2000

Reciprocating internal combustion engines – Safety requirements for design and construction of engines for use in potentially explosive atmospheres – Part 1: Group II engines for use in flammable gas and vapour atmospheres

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1834-2:2000

Reciprocating internal combustion engines – Safety requirements for design and construction of engines for use in potentially explosive atmospheres – Part 2: Group I engines for use in underground workings susceptible to firedamp and/or combustible dust

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1834-3:2000

Reciprocating internal combustion engines – Safety requirements for design and construction of engines for use in potentially explosive atmospheres – Part 3: Group II engines for use in flammable dust atmospheres

08/04/2016

CEN EN 1839:2017

Determination of the explosion limits and the limiting oxygen concentration(LOC) for flammable gases and vapours

09/06/2017

EN 1839:2012
EN 14756:2006

Note 2.1

11/01/2018

CEN EN 1953:2013

Atomising and spraying equipment for coating materials – Safety requirements

08/04/2016

CEN EN 12581:2005+A1:2010

Coating plants – Machinery for dip coating and electrodeposition of organic liquid coating material – Safety requirements

08/04/2016

CEN EN 12621:2006+A1:2010

Machinery for the supply and circulation of coating materials under pressure – Safety requirements

08/04/2016

CEN EN 12757-1:2005+A1:2010

Mixing machinery for coating materials – Safety requirements – Part 1: Mixing machinery for use in vehicle refinishing

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13012:2012

Petrol filling stations – Construction and performance of automatic nozzles for use on fuel dispensers

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13160-1:2003

Leak detection systems – Part 1: General principles

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13237:2012

Potentially explosive atmospheres – Terms and definitions for equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13463-2:2004

Non-electrical equipment for use in potentially explosive atmospheres – Part 2: Protection by flow restricting enclosure ‘fr’

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13463-3:2005

Non-electrical equipment for use in potentially explosive atmospheres – Part 3: Protection by flameproof enclosure ‘d’

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13616-1:2016

Overfill prevention devices for static tanks for liquid fuels – Part 1: Overfill prevention devices with closure device

12/08/2016

EN 13616:2004

Note 2.1

11/07/2017

CEN EN 13617-1:2012

Petrol filling stations – Part 1: Safety requirements for construction and performance of metering pumps, dispensers and remote pumping units

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13617-2:2012

Petrol filling stations – Part 2: Safety requirements for construction and performance of safe breaks for use on metering pumps and dispensers

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13617-3:2012

Petrol filling stations – Part 3: Safety requirements for construction and performance of shear valves

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13617-4:2012

Petrol filling stations – Part 4: Safety requirements for construction and performance of swivels for use on metering pumps and dispensers

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13760:2003

Automotive LPG filling system for light and heavy duty vehicles – Nozzle, test requirements and dimensions

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13821:2002

Potentially explosive atmospheres – Explosion prevention and protection – Determination of minimum ignition energy of dust/air mixtures

08/04/2016

CEN EN 13852-1:2013

Cranes – Offshore cranes – Part 1: General-purpose offshore cranes

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14034-1:2004+A1:2011

Determination of explosion characteristics of dust clouds – Part 1: Determination of the maximum explosion pressure pmax of dust clouds

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14034-2:2006+A1:2011

Determination of explosion characteristics of dust clouds – Part 2: Determination of the maximum rate of explosion pressure rise (dp/dt)max of dust clouds

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14034-3:2006+A1:2011

Determination of explosion characteristics of dust clouds – Part 3: Determination of the lower explosion limit LEL of dust clouds

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14034-4:2004+A1:2011

Determination of explosion characteristics of dust clouds – Part 4: Determination of the limiting oxygen concentration LOC of dust clouds

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14373:2005

Explosion suppression systems

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14460:2006

Explosion resistant equipment

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14491:2012

Dust explosion venting protective systems

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14492-1:2006+A1:2009

Cranes – Power driven winches and hoists – Part 1: Power driven winches

08/04/2016

EN 14492-1:2006+A1:2009/AC:2010 (new)

 

This is the first publication

CEN EN 14492-2:2006+A1:2009

Cranes – Power driven winches and hoists – Part 2: Power driven hoists

08/04/2016

EN 14492-2:2006+A1:2009/AC:2010 (new)

 

This is the first publication

CEN EN 14522:2005

Determination of the auto ignition temperature of gases and vapours

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14591-1:2004

Explosion prevention and protection in underground mines – Protective systems – Part 1: 2-bar explosion proof ventilation structure

08/04/2016

EN 14591-1:2004/AC:2006

 

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14591-2:2007

Explosion prevention and protection in underground mines – Protective systems – Part 2: Passive water trough barriers

08/04/2016

EN 14591-2:2007/AC:2008

 

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14591-4:2007

Explosion prevention and protection in underground mines – Protective systems – Part 4: Automatic extinguishing systems for road headers

08/04/2016

EN 14591-4:2007/AC:2008

 

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14677:2008

Safety of machinery – Secondary steelmaking – Machinery and equipment for treatment of liquid steel

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14678-1:2013

LPG equipment and accessories – Construction and performance of LPG equipment for automotive filling stations – Part 1: Dispensers

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14681:2006+A1:2010

Safety of machinery – Safety requirements for machinery and equipment for production of steel by electric arc furnaces

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14797:2006

Explosion venting devices

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14973:2015

Conveyor belts for use in underground installations – Electrical and flammability safety requirements

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14983:2007

Explosion prevention and protection in underground mines – Equipment and protective systems for firedamp drainage

08/04/2016

CEN EN 14986:2017

Design of fans working in potentially explosive atmospheres

09/06/2017

EN 14986:2007

Note 2.1

31/01/2020

CEN EN 14994:2007

Gas explosion venting protective systems

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15089:2009

Explosion isolation systems

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15188:2007

Determination of the spontaneous ignition behaviour of dust accumulations

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15198:2007

Methodology for the risk assessment of non-electrical equipment and components for intended use in potentially explosive atmospheres

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15233:2007

Methodology for functional safety assessment of protective systems for potentially explosive atmospheres

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15268:2008

Petrol filling stations – Safety requirements for the construction of submersible pump assemblies

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15794:2009

Determination of explosion points of flammable liquids

08/04/2016

CEN EN 15967:2011

Determination of maximum explosion pressure and the maximum rate of pressure rise of gases and vapours

08/04/2016

CEN EN 16009:2011

Flameless explosion venting devices

08/04/2016

CEN EN 16020:2011

Explosion diverters

08/04/2016

CEN EN 16447:2014

Explosion isolation flap valves

08/04/2016

CEN EN ISO 16852:2016

Flame arresters – Performance requirements, test methods and limits for use (ISO 16852:2016)

09/06/2017

EN ISO 16852:2010

Note 2.1

30/11/2017

CEN EN ISO 80079-36:2016

Explosive atmospheres – Part 36: Non-electrical equipment for explosive atmospheres – Basic method and requirements (ISO 80079-36:2016)

12/08/2016

EN 13463-1:2009

Note 2.1

31/10/2019

CEN EN ISO 80079-37:2016

Explosive atmospheres – Part 37: Non-electrical equipment for explosive atmospheres – Non-electrical type of protection constructional safety ”c”, control of ignition sources ”b”, liquid immersion ”k” (ISO 80079-37:2016)

12/08/2016

EN 13463-5:2011
EN 13463-6:2005
EN 13463-8:2003

Note 2.1

31/10/2019

Cenelec EN 50050-1:2013

Electrostatic hand-held spraying equipment – Safety requirements – Part 1: Hand-held spraying equipment for ignitable liquid coating materials

08/04/2016

EN 50050:2006

Note 2.1

14/10/2016

Cenelec EN 50050-2:2013

Electrostatic hand-held spraying equipment – Safety requirements – Part 2: Hand-held spraying equipment for ignitable coating powder

08/04/2016

EN 50050:2006

Note 2.1

14/10/2016

Cenelec EN 50050-3:2013

Electrostatic hand-held spraying equipment – Safety requirements – Part 3: Hand-held spraying equipment for ignitable flock

08/04/2016

EN 50050:2006

Note 2.1

14/10/2016

Cenelec EN 50104:2010

Electrical apparatus for the detection and measurement of oxygen – Performance requirements and test methods

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 50176:2009

Stationary electrostatic application equipment for ignitable liquid coating material – Safety requirements

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 50177:2009

Stationary electrostatic application equipment for ignitable coating powders – Safety requirements

08/04/2016

EN 50177:2009/A1:2012

 

08/04/2016

Note 3

Cenelec EN 50223:2015

Stationary electrostatic application equipment for ignitable flock material – Safety requirements

08/04/2016

EN 50223:2010

Note 2.1

13/04/2018

Cenelec EN 50271:2010

Electrical apparatus for the detection and measurement of combustible gases, toxic gases or oxygen – Requirements and tests for apparatus using software and/or digital technologies

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 50281-2-1:1998

Electrical apparatus for use in the presence of combustible dust – Part 2-1: Test methods – Methods for determining the minimum ignition temperatures of dust

08/04/2016

EN 50281-2-1:1998/AC:1999

 

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 50303:2000

Group I, Category M1 equipment intended to remain functional in atmospheres endangered by firedamp and/or coal dust

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 50381:2004

Transportable ventilated rooms with or without an internal source of release

08/04/2016

EN 50381:2004/AC:2005

 

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 50495:2010

Safety devices required for the safe functioning of equipment with respect to explosion risks

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-0:2012

Explosive atmospheres – Part 0: Equipment – General requirements
IEC 60079-0:2011 (Modified) + IS1:2013

08/04/2016

EN 60079-0:2012/A11:2013

 

08/04/2016

Note 3

07/10/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-1:2014

Explosive atmospheres – Part 1: Equipment protection by flameproof enclosures “d”
IEC 60079-1:2014

08/04/2016

EN 60079-1:2007

Note 2.1

01/08/2017

Cenelec EN 60079-2:2014

Explosive atmospheres – Part 2: Equipment protection by pressurized enclosure “p”
IEC 60079-2:2014

08/04/2016

EN 60079-2:2007
EN 61241-4:2006

Note 2.1

25/08/2017

EN 60079-2:2014/AC:2015

 

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-5:2015

Explosive atmospheres – Part 5: Equipment protection by powder filling “q”
IEC 60079-5:2015

08/04/2016

EN 60079-5:2007

Note 2.1

24/03/2018

Cenelec EN 60079-6:2015

Explosive atmospheres – Part 6: Equipment protection by liquid immersion “o”
IEC 60079-6:2015

08/04/2016

EN 60079-6:2007

Note 2.1

27/03/2018

Cenelec EN 60079-7:2015

Explosive atmospheres – Part 7: Equipment protection by increased safety “e”
IEC 60079-7:2015

08/04/2016

EN 60079-7:2007

Note 2.1

31/07/2018

Cenelec EN 60079-11:2012

Explosive atmospheres – Part 11: Equipment protection by intrinsic safety “i”
IEC 600
IEC 60079-11:2011

08/04/2016

EN 60079-27:2008

Note 2.1

Cenelec EN 60079-15:2010

Explosive atmospheres – Part 15: Equipment protection by type of protection “n”
IEC 60079-15:2010

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-18:2015

Explosive atmospheres – Part 18: Equipment protection by encapsulation “m”
IEC 60079-18:2014

08/04/2016

EN 60079-18:2009

Note 2.1

16/01/2018

Cenelec EN 60079-20-1:2010

Explosive atmospheres – Part 20-1: Material characteristics for gas and vapour classification – Test methods and data
IEC 60079
IEC 60079-20-1:2010

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-25:2010

Explosive atmospheres – Part 25: Intrinsically safe electrical systems
IEC 60079-25:2010

08/04/2016

EN 60079-25:2010/AC:2013

 

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-26:2015

Explosive atmospheres – Part 26: Equipment with Equipment Protection Level (EPL) Ga
IEC 60079-26:2014

08/04/2016

EN 60079-26:2007

Note 2.1

02/12/2017

Cenelec EN 60079-28:2015

Explosive atmospheres – Part 28: Protection of equipment and transmission systems using optical radiation
IEC 60079-28:2015

08/04/2016

EN 60079-28:2007

Note 2.1

01/07/2018

Cenelec EN 60079-29-1:2016

Explosive atmospheres – Part 29-1: Gas detectors – Performance requirements of detectors for flammable gases
IEC 60079-29-1:2016 (Modified)

09/06/2017

EN 60079-29-1:2007

Note 2.1

23/12/2019

Cenelec EN 60079-29-4:2010

Explosive atmospheres – Part 29-4: Gas detectors – Performance requirements of open path detectors for flammable gases
IEC 60079-29-4:2009 (Modified)

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-30-1:2007

Explosive atmospheres – Part 30-1: Electrical resistance trace heating – General and testing requirements
IEC 60079-30-1:2007

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN 60079-30-1:2017 (new)

Explosive atmospheres – Part 30-1: Electrical resistance trace heating – General and testing requirements
IEC/IEEE 60079-30-1:2015 (Modified)

This is the first publication

EN 60079-30-1:2007

Note 2.1

06/03/2020

Cenelec EN 60079-31:2014

Explosive atmospheres – Part 31: Equipment dust ignition protection by enclosure “t”
IEC 60079-31:2013

08/04/2016

EN 60079-31:2009

Note 2.1

01/01/2017

Cenelec EN 60079-35-1:2011

Explosive atmospheres – Part 35-1: Caplights for use in mines susceptible to firedamp – General requirements – Construction and testing in relation to the risk of explosion
IEC 60079-35-1:2011

08/04/2016

EN 60079-35-1:2011/AC:2011

 

08/04/2016

Cenelec EN ISO/IEC 80079-34:2011

Explosive atmospheres – Part 34: Application of quality systems for equipment manufacture (ISO/IEC 80079-34:2011)

08/04/2016

(1) ESO: European standardisation organisation:

CEN: Avenue Marnix 17, B-1000, Brussels, Tel.+32 2 5500811; fax +32 2 5500819 (http://www.cen.eu)

CENELEC: Avenue Marnix 17, B-1000, Brussels, Tel.+32 2 5196871; fax +32 2 5196919 (http://www.cenelec.eu)

ETSI: 650, route des Lucioles, F-06921 Sophia Antipolis, Tel.+33 492 944200; fax +33 493 654716, (http://www.etsi.eu)

 

Note 1: Generally the date of cessation of presumption of conformity will be the date of withdrawal (“dow”), set by the European standardisation organisation, but attention of users of these standards is drawn to the fact that in certain exceptional cases this can be otherwise.

Note 2.1: The new (or amended) standard has the same scope as the superseded standard. On the date stated, the superseded standard ceases to give presumption of conformity with the essential or other requirements of the relevant Union legislation.

Note 2.2: The new standard has a broader scope than the superseded standard. On the date stated the superseded standard ceases to give presumption of conformity with the essential or other requirements of the relevant Union legislation.

Note 2.3: The new standard has a narrower scope than the superseded standard. On the date stated the (partially) superseded standard ceases to give presumption of conformity with the essential or other requirements of the relevant Union legislation for those products or services that fall within the scope of the new standard. Presumption of conformity with the essential or other requirements of the relevant Union legislation for products or services that still fall within the scope of the (partially) superseded standard, but that do not fall within the scope of the new standard, is unaffected.

Note 3: In case of amendments, the referenced standard is EN CCCCC:YYYY, its previous amendments, if any, and the new, quoted amendment. The superseded standard therefore consists of EN CCCCC:YYYY and its previous amendments, if any, but without the new quoted amendment. On the date stated, the superseded standard ceases to give presumption of conformity with the essential or other requirements of the relevant Union legislation.

Source: http://ec.europa.eu

BARTEC and eVision Enter into Global Partnership

In a clear push towards mobile innovation, BARTEC and eVision are proud to announce a global agreement for the delivery of rugged, intrinsically safe devices. This partnership ensures worldwide distribution and support of eVision’s suite of mobile Control of Work applications on BARTEC’s explosion-proof mobile devices.

During daily operations, equipment dependability is a priority. BARTEC’s flexible and powerful ATEX-compliant devices offer the perfect gateway to eVision’s advanced front line Control of Work tools, enabling personnel to work faster, safer, and with more situational awareness.

“Partnering with BARTEC is the ideal next step towards the mobile future. This synergy between software and hardware provides the front line workforce with the tools they require to further improve daily maintenance”, says Ton Geelen, eVision’s Chief Commercial Officer. “We look forward to jointly innovating in this highly impactful area within Control of Work.”

BARTEC’s rugged Android devices will support eVision’s supplementary Control of Work applications, enabling users to, for example, verify isolations on-site, perform gas measurements, and bring permits live. eVision’s application suite makes full use of BARTEC’s advanced technology, including Barcode and RFID scanning, resulting in shorter work processes and increased hands-on tool time.

“Through the cooperation with partners like eVision, we set new standards for enterprise mobility in hazardous areas. The smart combination of state-of-the-art hardware and innovative software provides the operators with a solution making the daily work safer, more efficient and easier to handle”, confirms Nader Halmuschi, Vice President Automation & Communication Systems at BARTEC. “Any hardware is only as good as the software running on the device but a software can only work well if the used devices meet all relevant safety requirements. Therefore, BARTEC and eVision are the perfect match: Together we make the world a safer place!”

New Fast Boiling Point Process Analyzer Launches in California

BARTEC BENKE recently displayed ist new rapiDist-4 Analyzer at the ISA Analysis Division’s 62nd Annual Meeting in Pasadena which took place on 23-27 April. This analyzer’s launch was very well received in Pasadena and is expected to be highly sought after across the globe.

The rapiDist-4 offers rapid, reliable and accurate boiling point measurements to allow for fast process control of atmospheric distillation columns and blending processes for all types of middle distillates and f

eedstock for petrochemical processing (naphtha), jet fuels, fuel oils, diesel fuels and similar petroleum products and liquid hydrocarbons.

The rapiDist-4 is capable of taking measurements from IBP to FBP, programming the analyzer is relatively simple and the results will correlate with ASTM D86. rapiDist-4 offers an ASTM D86 conform validation, which is optional. The cycle time is only 10 to 15 minutes (for diesel 10 minutes). The core components of this unit, such as the dosing unit, vaporiser, condenser and receiver, also meet the design specifications set out by ASTM D86.

The analyzer incorporates integrated diagnostic and maintenance features, which include an automatic decoking devise and remote access. rapiDist-4 also features a non-contact and very robust optical level measurement for the dosing and receiver unit.

The highly robust rapiDist-4 is certified to operate in hazardous areas under ATEX, IECEx, CSA C/US, TRCU, among others on request.

Germany solidifies top ranking in EU wind power league

Germany installed 42% of the EU’s new wind power capacity in 2017, a year that saw the industry installing more supplies than any other form of energy across the European Union, according to fresh industry statistics published on Tuesday (13 February).

15.7 GW of new wind power capacity was installed in the EU during 2017, representing 55% of total new power capacity added last year in Europe, according to WindEurope, a trade association. This an increase of 20% over 2016.

Germany led the pack, with 6.6 GW new wind power capacity installed in 2017, or 42% of the EU total. The country also registered the highest annual increase of wind energy in its electricity demand – from 16% to 20% year-on-year.

Overall, the country remains on top of the European league, with the largest total installed wind power capacity, followed by Spain, the UK and France. Denmark, meanwhile, is the country with the largest share of wind in its power mix, reaching 44% of the country’s electricity demand.

More generally, renewable energies – mainly wind and solar – accounted for an overwhelming majority of new power in Europe, representing 85% of new electricity capacity installed in 2017.

Wind energy now accounts for 18% of EU’s total installed power generation capacity.

Meanwhile, power output from fuel oil and coal-fired power plants declined as electricity companies continued to decommission more capacity than they installed. Supplies of gas-fired power remained stable, with the amount of decommissioned capacity almost equalling newly-commissioned gas-fired generation capacity.

Investment slowing

Giles Dickson, the CEO of WindEurope, said the record 2017 performance was further evidence that wind power is now mainstream and “delivers bang for your buck”.

However, he also warned the record year also reflected the fact that a “lot of the new projects were ‘pushed through the gates’ to benefit from feed-in-tariffs and other old support schemes while they still applied.”

Indeed, there are signs that investments in wind power are slowing down, reaching €22.3bn in 2017, a 19% decrease compared to 2016.

“Despite the strong figures, the medium and longer term outlook for wind is uncertain.  The transition to auctions has been messier than we hoped. And crucially we lack clarity from many governments on their ambitions for renewables post-2020,” Dickson said in a statement, calling on EU policymakers to adopt a 35% target for renewables to be reached by 2030.

“A 35% target is not just affordable, it’s economically desirable,” Dickson said. “The wind industry has shown it can deliver. Now we need policy-makers to deliver as well.”

Source: https://www.euractiv.com

CIPPE – cippe Zhenwei Petroleum Exhibition The Annual World Petroleum Equipment Congress

The 18th China International Petroleum & Petrochemical Technology and Equipment Exhibition

Profile of exhibition

China International Petroleum & Petrochemical Technology and Equipment Exhibition (cippe) is an annual gathering of petroleum and petrochemical industry. With a magnificent exhibition space of around 90,000 sqm, 18 national pavilions, 1,800 exhibitors and over 110,000 professional visitors from 65 countries and regions, cippe has become the largest petroleum exhibition in the world.

cippe2017 Beijing has an attendance of 18 national pavilions from USA, Germany, UK, France, Canada, Danmark, Italy, Russia, Korea etc. The well-known global enterprises such as ExxonMobil, Caterpillar, Schlumberger, 3M , MTU, National Oil Varco, Schneider, Cummins, Honeywell, Rockwell, AkzoNobel, Hempel, Endress+Hauser, and so on , have all participated in the event.

Moreover, cippe2017  has received great support from the domestic oil giants such as CNPC Pavilion, Sinopec Oil Engineering Machinery Company, CNOOC, CSSC, CSIC, CIMC, RAFFLES, RG Petro-machinery (Group)Co.,Ltd.,HONGHUA,YANTAI JEREH, KERUI, SANY, NHI, HBP, Tidfore, JERRYWON, ANTON, JUNMA, SHENKAI, Tianjin LILIN and etc.

The 18th China International Petroleum & Petrochemical Technology and Equipment Exhibition (cippe2018 Beijing) will be held on March 27-29, 2018 in New China International Exhibition Center.

THE WORLD’S LARGEST GLOBAL GAS CONFERENCE

The World Gas Conference is the most important global gas industry gathering of influential leaders, policy-makers, buyers, sellers and experts. Conducted since 1931 by the International Gas Union (IGU), the triennial event aims to raise the voice of natural gas while offering timely updates on strategic, commercial and technical issues facing the entire gas value chain.

The 27th World Gas Conference (WGC 2018) takes place in Washington DC from June 25-29 and offers the most comprehensive and diverse program to date for the natural gas industry. For the first time ever this includes topics for professionals working in sectors including finance, trading, law, sustainability & renewables, policy & Government and many more. View the interactive online program.

WGC 2018 is proud to host over 600 of the industry’s most senior speakers from all over the world, including US Secretary of Energy Rick Perry, and CEOs from global companies including Chevron, ExxonMobil, Qatar Petroleum, Gazprom, BP, Total, ConocoPhillips and Shell to name a few.

Source: https://wgc2018.com/

2018 IECEx International Conference

Safety of Equipment, Services and Personnel in Explosive Atmospheres

Split, Croatia – 23rd April 2018 – 08:30 to 17:30

The Conference will be held at: 

Hotel Le Méridien Lav
Grljevacka, 2A, Podstrana
Split, 21312, Croatia

Please find the conference event brochure below for the programme of events:

Conference Brochure

Source: http://www.iecex.com/

Notified bodies for ATEX

Notified bodies for ATEX

Source: http://ec.europa.eu/growth/sectors/mechanical-engineering/atex_en

Achema 2018

ACHEMA (2018) – World Forum and Leading Show for the Process Industries

11 – 15 June 2018, Frankfurt am Main, Germany

 

Recommended companies to visit at ACHEMA:

SCHRAMM GmbH: https://www.schramm-gmbh.de/en/startseite/

BARTEC  GmbH: https://www.bartec.de/en/

SPROGI ZONA LTD: https://exzona.lt/exzona.html

Two liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals, connected by a pipeline across the Gulf of Finland by 2019.

A large regional terminal would be built in Finland while Estonia would get a smaller gas distribution terminal, the Finnish government said in a statement.

The plan, which aims to cut the countries’ dependence on Russian gas, was put on hold a month ago due to failure to agree on how the countries’ gas companies can share EU financial assistance.

Finland said that it remained unknown whether there would be adequate support available from the European Union.

“The entity must be economically viable. At the end of the day, the costs of the investment must be paid by the gas users,” economy minister Jan Vapaavuori said in the statement.

The countries expect the EU to cover 75% of the pipeline’s estimated cost of €200 million. Together with the two terminals, the total cost of the project is seen at around €500 million.

The deal also included future access to Latvia’s underground gas inventories, Finland said.

It added that it and Estonia would proceed with the project as quickly as financially possible. If the regional terminal was not well advanced by the end of 2016, it could be built in Estonia.

The Finnish government earlier this month prepared for the LNG move by taking control of the country’s sole gas utility Gasum in a €510 million deal.

Info provided by: http://www.euractiv.com